Tag Archives: conscious consumers

The Best Eco Pen & Eco Craft Options – & Not Just for the Kids

Eco Pen 7 Eco Craft Supplies For the Conscious Parent

Eco Pen & Eco Craft Supplies For the Conscious Parent

Doing craft, coloring, drawing, making, cutting, slicing, sticking is a big part of kids’ lives, and they use a lot of ‘stuff’ doing it. So thinking about the impact on the environment of all this activity means eco craft & eco pen supplies do matter. After doing a rather soul destroying sort out and throw out of the kid’s dud felt tip marker pens, I wondered whether apart from using wax crayons and recycled or sustainable colored pencils, (and recycled paper to draw on), was there an eco pen option for kids specifically for coloring (not just writing)?

Then it occurred to me that actually with the new craze of coloring pages for adults catching on, eco-friendly pens, especially felt tip pens are kind of important for the big kids too (because who wants to use that fantastically awful product the Bic Pen For Women to do coloring with?).

So off I set on the internet hunt to find an eco friendly pen for colouring, to assuage my conscience of the probably millions & billions of plastic felt tip pens and markers that no longer have any love to give gathered in landfills everywhere. You see only part of most felt tip pens is recyclable (the lid), so the rest? Well you know the drill, it takes petrochemicals & heaps energy to make then, then after short term use our rainbow hued releasers of childhood imagination end up in landfill leaching chemicals into the soil and yup eventually the waterways. Ace.

Because nothing says ‘the wonder of childhood’ quite like making products that pollute their future.

So are there any Eco Pens on the Market Suitable for Coloring In?

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3 Ways to Reduce the Environmental Impact of Your Wardrobe Without the Costs

150709 3 ways to green your wardrobe

When we think about problems in the way clothes are made we think mainly about the ethics – the people who make them and how they are treated. This is a really serious concern, but just as serious, is the environmental footprint of our clothing. 

Recently Sam Judd from Sustainable Coastlines, highlighted the problems with plastic (polyester) in clothing – the pollution their production creates and the plastic fibers they shed into the environment  when they are washed.

It is true that plastic based fabrics are pretty horrid, they can be made from recycled plastics, which has some benefits over new polyester fabric in terms of the environmental footprint – but this does not prevent micro plastics being shed into the ocean. Frankly, given the environmental problems with plastic generally, why buy something with plastic in it if you can buy something that is just as functional, if not more functional, without it?

Natural fibres like cotton and wool, hemp etc are often touted as being preferable: there are some buts. Non organically grown cotton uses a huge amount of water in production, a lot of pesticides on the crop (which ends up in the soil, and eventually the bodies of farmers and their children) and the fabric dying process creates a vast amount of toxic water waste, which in countries without strict regulation is pumped directly into waterways untreated, creating a toxic soup in local water supplies and eventually the sea.

Wool (a supposedly natural and environmental friendly fibre) has to be cleaned (a sheep wore it through bushes and pooed on it before you got it you know). Such cleaning (called scouring) is mostly done with harsh chemicals to dissolve the dirt, chemicals which again end up in local waterways in China, India, Bangladesh and other textile producing developing countries.

HOWEVER, not all is lost! There three main ways to ensure that the clothing in your wardrobe has as little impact on the environment as possible (apart from producing it all yourself that is!)

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20 Ethical Clothing & Organic Clothing Brands for Kids We LOVE

Ethical clothes for kids we love

Ethical clothes for kids we love

We know it is hard sometimes to get hold of ethical clothing & organic clothing for kids. You mean well, intend well and then? Well the practicalities just get in the way of doing well. Muka kids is a social enterprise that exists to make it a lot easier to get hold of fantastic affordable ethical clothing & organic clothing for kids. One way we help is we have a marketplace for buying & selling accredited pre-loved (and some new) ethical and organic clothing. In this blog we want to tell you about the best of these accredited brands. Some of these brands actually offer discounts to those who trade on muka kids. So if you buy ethical sustainable clothes new &  ‘Regood’ them on our marketplace we reward you for being sustainable and well just super.

Ethical clothing all starts with some great small companies

In the muka model it all starts with those fantastic people pushing the boat out in small and independent ethical clothing and organic clothing brands, doing their darnedest to do the right thing and make clothes that meet ethical and sustainable standards. It is HARD: a hard slog, lower returns, with a small (but growing market) of customers.

These ethical clothing companies and the people who run them care. They care deeply about changing the way the clothing system works, and while all of them might not have the gold standard for ethical clothing or organic clothing in place right now, I tell you they are striving to do things a better way AND make sure they have a successful ethical business so they can keep making a difference.

Ethical Clothing Brands & Organic Clothing Brands We LOVE* (many of which you can find on our marketplace in affordable preloved condtion)

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Why are ethical kids clothes so expensive?

Why are most kids clothes that you buy so costly and especially ethical kids clothes?

Well a lot of it is to do with the way they are made. Lets start with standard kids clothing. There are A LOT of stages in the long journey from a cotton seed to garment (most kids clothing is made of cotton or cotton mix) and for every step in that journey there is a cost. Here is a pictogram neatly summarizing all the steps in how cotton clothing gets made. Needless to say it is long, with lots of people involved and lots of processing. It is kind of interesting in a ‘how stuff works’ way.

Anyway, what exactly are all these costs and at what points in the chain do they apply? The following infographic sums up the costs nicely….

 

 non ethical kids clothes are costly is many ways

costly huh?

So, at every step there are some serious costs in production. Costs borne mainly by women, by children and by the environment.

So I know you get that I am being ironic to make a point, and that I am kind of beating you over the head with my lack of subtlety. I cannot disagree. But for all my lack of subtlety the point is, I think, an important one. We often talk about the cost of kids clothes (standard AND ethical kids clothes), only in relation to our immediate cash flow, what is in our bank account at the time we are needing to re-dress whatever particular child has worn a hole, grown 2cm, or beaten a piece of clothing into submission. Continue Reading →

Sixteen Easy Steps to Insanity By ‘A Parent’

Buying the good way is sometimes the hard way

Let me introduce you to my own private hell – buying ethical clothes for my kids. It goes like this.I look one day at one of my children’s outfits. I notice that suddenly the ankles are nearer the knees, the cuffs nearer to elbows, there is a hole in the bum of the pants, and the child is walking like a small monkey because the top is so tight across the back. Cue hysteria. I will need to get new clothes. And the 16 easy steps to my insanity go like this…

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Top 18 Organic & Ethical Mens Clothing Brands

Men Care. Really.

Men Care. Really.

Being married to a bloke (partner in crime – mainly ones that embarrass the kids), having a brother (Uncle extraordinaire), a brother in law (supreme wrangler of twins ) and oh you know I talk to some man folk occasionally about thoughts and feelings and stuff too … I  get that they also care about ethics and the environment (shock horror) and give a rats about who make their clothes (Gasp). But weirdly often men go unconsidered when discussing sustainability, ethics and clothing. So I thought it was about time they felt the love and got their own guide on the top organic and ethical mens clothing brands.

I will admit that it is a little bit painful in our house when the man (yep he is the only one – given the cat is neutered) requires new underwear and t-shirts. Organic mens clothing is a stretch and ethical menswear is just a total faff to find. There is a lot of internet window shopping, deep sighs (from him), and hissed intakes of breath (me). Eventually I hop on line buy something on behalf and don’t you know it the undies go up your bum (or whatever the male equivalent to that is). Unsatisfactory to say the least.

So let not my pain be your pain and if you have a bloke or indeed are a bloke and you are looking for ethical mens clothing options let my (and my beloveds) research guide you  (and yes your ethical menswear and organic clothing will be able to be traded on our muka market place for preloved (and some new) ethical and organic clothing).

Note that the brands here are not ALL certified fair trade or organic menswear (there is just not all that many options out there at the gold standard) but all are in some way  making inroads to a more ethical mens fashion industry and indeed more sustainable clothing industry.*

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What is Wrong with the Kittens? (or Why Unisex Clothing is Good for Kids)

unisex clothing for kids

just do it!

If I asked you to think about most girls clothing what sort of images come to mind? Here is what I get:

Kittens, kittens wearing bows, kittens wearing lipstick and heels, kitten heels, bows, lipstick, hearts, kisses, girls and boys kissing, PRINCESSESS (a lot of these). Stars, frills, tiaras. Pink, purple, tiny bikinis.

What have I left off? Oh yes inappropriate designs & slogans which are creeping slowly and inexorably into our little girls clothing  like this one recently posted by an appalled Dad*.

Now bring to mind boys clothing. Trucks, trains, planes automobiles. Dinosaurs, racing cars, monsters and camouflage. Green, khaki, black and Blue. Diggers, planes, skateboards too. ‘Rad’ ‘Awesome’ and Supercool.

By the way this stuff is NOT awesome at all.

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10 Ways to Make Kids Clothes Last Longer: Care (Part 2 of 2)

Extending the Life of Clothes WILL help save the world

Extending the Life of Clothes WILL help save the world

Increasing the lifespan of clothes has a whole HEAP of benefits.  At muka kids  we know making kids clothes last longer will actually will help save the planet and is (of course) better for family budgets. This is part of the reason why we have a marketplace to buy and sell previously loved organic and ethical kids clothing. In part 1 of this blog topic, I focused on ten design features that make kids clothes last longer that you can look out for. This second post is focussed on the ten things you can do to look after kids clothes so they last (based on science- I love science!)

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10 Ways to Make Kids Clothes Last Longer: Design Features (Part 1 of 2)

Increasing the lifespan of clothes has a whole HEAP of benefits.  At muka kids  we know keeping kids clothes in longer use will help save the planet and is (of course) better for family budgets. Improving the sustainability of clothing is part of the reason why we have a marketplace to buy and sell previously loved organic and ethical kids clothing. In this, the first of a two part feature on making kids clothes last,  I want to focus on the ten design features that make kids clothes last longer. The second feature covers 10 ways that you can care for kids clothes that will help them last longer (based on science- I love science!)

The carbon, water and waste footprint of clothes is surprisingly large (the average family’s annual clothes requirements produce carbon the equivalent of driving 10,000 km, uses 889 baths worth of water and creates the waste equivalent to throwing out 80 pairs or so of jeans). So, it is a resource intensive process making new clothes, using them (and then not using them). The longer we can make clothes last and the greater number of kids that wear an item, the less environmental damage that particular piece of clothing is responsible for (and all the better for budgets too).

 

140707 Quote for extending life of clothes blog part 1

 

What are the Ten Design Features  That Help Clothes Last Longer? Continue Reading →